How to store coffee at home.

breathing valve on coffee

We’re pretty picky about how coffee is stored and honestly it’s pretty easy. There are a few ways people store coffee that we’ve encountered over the years and several of them are big no no’s, so we figured we’d share with you quickly how we do it and why. The basic fact to know is that roasted coffee has two enemies: oxygen and light. When you by coffee from us you’ll notice that it’s stored in a smaller bag that has a degassing valve and doesn’t allow any light in. The degassing valve allows pressure out of the bag as fresh coffee degasses after being roasted. This makes sure the sealed bag won’t explode but doesn’t allow air back into the bag so the coffee stays fresh. The non-transparent package functions primarily to keep the light out. Using it up quickly will also obviously help keep it fresh. This is primarily why we do twelve-ounce bags for the retail size packages instead of a full pound; it allows you to use it up a little faster thus keeping your coffee supply fresh.

So after you open your fresh bag of coffee the easiest and best way to store it is to just roll down the bag as tight as you can, clip it in some way to keep it closed, use it quickly and you should be good. It’s that easy. Glass jar? No. Freezer? NO WAY. Vacuum seal? That’s up to you. The key is to just seal it up and use it quickly. Now you’re one small step closer to brewing better coffee at home. So go to your friend’s freezer, grab that coffee and throw it out. But make sure to bring them some fresh coffee to ease the blow.

Dark Roast Debunk

Medium Deeper Roots roast on the left. Very dark, unnamed coffee giant roast on the right. Note oil migration and see some of the coffees have even exploded a bit on the dark roast... no good!
Medium Deeper Roots roast on the left. Very dark, unnamed coffee giant roast on the right. Note oil migration and see some of the coffees have even exploded a bit on the dark roast... no good!

We know. You like “bold”, dark coffees. That’s ok! But we want to give you a little ammo for next time you head out to buy a dark roasted coffee and debunk a common myth about the roast level of coffees.

The main myth we want to debunk is: “Coffee is better when you can see the oils on the bean.”

As coffee is roasted, the cell structure of the bean undergoes significant change. Different chemical reactions occur to bring out or subdue certain flavor compounds depending on what the roaster is trying to accomplish. As coffee is roasted darker and darker, the cell structure of the bean starts to break down and allow those flavor compounds, contained in oils, to migrate to the outside of the bean. So, in medium to light roasts, you wont see these oils on the bean because the cell structure is still mostly in tact and keeping those flavor-containing oils safe inside the bean. The problem with having these oils on the outside of the bean is that they are exposed to air and immediately start to oxidize. Think about the time you left a glass of water on the counter overnight and tried to drink it the next day or even two days after. The water tastes old and stale due to oxidation from exposure to air. The same thing happens to the oils on the outside of the bean and immediately makes them start to taste old and stale. So if you’ve been told that seeing oil on the bean correlates to more flavor, now you know that’s not true! However, the problem still remains that you want to buy a fresh coffee that doesn’t taste oxidized but still gives you the boldness you want. We suggest you investigate what “bold” means to you whether it be dark chocolate, smoky, thick body, etc and try to find a little bit lighter roasted coffees that fit those descriptions. We suggest some African coffee origins such as Malawi and Tanzania and Asian origins such as Sumatra and Sulawesi. Though these origins don’t always display these flavor characteristics, they often do and are a great place to start looking. We know that the answer isn’t always a light roast so we offer a blend called Losantiville. It’s the darkest roast we offer and it’s on the darker side of medium roast allowing the oils to stay in the bean but still allow for a smoky, full body, dark chocolate taste experience. The important part is to find coffees roasted to the point where YOU are the one extracting those oils when you brew and are still able to taste what you like. Now that you know a little bit more, drink up!